Resource Details

Between and within-site comparisons of structural and physiological characteristics and foliar nutrient content of 14 tree species at a wet, fertile site and a dry, infertile site in Panama

Literature: Journal Articles

Craven, D., Braden, D., Ashton, M.S., Berlyn, G.P., Wishnie, M. & Dent, D. 2007, "Between and within-site comparisons of structural and physiological characteristics and foliar nutrient content of 14 tree species at a wet, fertile site and a dry, infertile site in Panama", Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 238, no. 1-3, pp. 335-346.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: Dylan.Craven@aya.yale.edu

Affiliations

  • Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, 205 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511, USA  
  • Native Species Reforestation Project (PRORENA), Center for Tropical Forest Science, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Unit 0948, APO, AA 34002, USA

Link(s)

Journal - Forest Ecology and Management

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Species Info

  • Albizia adinocephala
  • Albizia guachapele
  • Calycophyllum candidissimun
  • Cedrela odorata
  • Dipteryx panamensis
  • Enterolobium cyclocarpum
  • Erythrina fusca
  • Gliricidia sepium
  • Guazuma ulmifolia
  • Luehea seemannii
  • Ochroma pyramidale
  • Pachira quinata
  • Spondias mombin
  • Tectona grandis (Exotic)

Description

  • In 2003, species selection trials were established at two sites in Panama to evaluate the viability of 13 native and 1 exotic tree species for reforestation in plantations.
  • This research evaluates the functional traits (leaf area index, water use efficiency, gas exchange, leaf mass area, foliar C:foliar N ratios, tree height, crown diameter, diameter ant breast height, and height of live crown) in a seasonally wet forest site and a seasonally dry forest site.
  • As hypothesized, trees experienced less environmental stress, more productivity, more photosynthetic capacity, and more foliar nutrient content at the wet forest site than the dry forest site.
  • Leaf Area Index (LAI) was a good predictor of plant growth.
  • Additionally, the growth of pioneer species correlated with high water-use efficiency and low density leaves.
  • Nitrogen fixing species demonstrated higher water-use efficiencies at the dry sites.
  • The authors suggest that pioneer species be used for the more fertile wet sites while N fixing species be used at the less fertile dry sites.

Related Publications and Projects

Geographical Region

  • Southern Central America
  • Country

  • Panama
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