Resource Details

Impacts of Herbicide Application and Mechanical Cleanings on Growth and Mortality of Two Timber Species in Saccharum spontaneum Grasslands of the Panama Canal Watershed

Literature: Journal Articles

Craven, D., Hall, J. & Verjans, J. 2009, "Impacts of Herbicide Application and Mechanical Cleanings on Growth and Mortality of Two Timber Species in Saccharum spontaneum Grasslands of the Panama Canal Watershed", Restoration Ecology, vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 751-761.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: dylan.craven@yale.edu

Affiliations

  • Native Species Reforestation Project (PRORENA), Center for Tropical Forest Science, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Avenida Roosevelt 401, Balboa, Ancon, Republic of Panama
  • Eco-Forest S.A., Apartado 32, Balboa, Ancon, Republic of Panama

Link(s)

Restoration Ecology

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Species Info

  • Tectona grandis (exotic)
  • Terminalia amazonia

Description

  • Proliferation of the invasive, exotic grass Saccharum spontaneum promotes fire and prevents the natural regeneration of native tree species.
  • The researchers evaluate the effectiveness of weed control treatments (herbicide application and mechanical cleanings) in promoting the growth and survival of the exotic tree species Tectona grandis and the native tree species Terminalia amazonia.
  • Overall, T. amazonia demonstrated slower growth than T. grandis; though, growth and survival of T. amazonia increased in the third year since establishment.
  • Both species responded positively to the control treatments, with the most effective treatment being annual herbicide application with more frequent cleanings (greater than 4 per year).
  • T. amazonia responded better than T. grandis to treatments with no herbicide.
  • The authors assert that with weed control of S. spontaneum grass, reforestation can be viable.

Related Publications and Projects

Geographical Region

  • Southern Central America
  • Country

  • Panama
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