Resource Details

Designing Mixed Species Tree Plantations for the Tropics: Balancing Ecological Attributes of Species with Landholder Preferences in the Philippines

Literature: Journal Articles Available at NO COST

Huong N., Lamb, D. Herbohn, J, and J. Firn. 2014. "Designing mixed tree plantations for the tropics: Balancing ecological attributes of species with landholder preferences in the Philippines", PLOS One, 9(4):1-11.

Contact Info

Corresponding author: h.nguyen22@uq.edu.au

Affiliations

  • School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia
  • Forest Industries Research Centre, The University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Australia
  • Centre for Mined Land Research, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Australia
  • Faculty of Science and Technology, School of Earth, Environmental and Biological Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia

Link(s)

Available at no cost from: Plos One

Species Info

  • Leucaena laucocephala
  • Melia dubia
  • Gmelina arborea
  • Pterocymbium tinctorium
  • Tectona grandis
  • Sandoricum koetjape
  • Gymnostoma rumphianum
  • Terminalia macrocarpa
  • Samanea saman
  • Dracontamelon dao
  • Artocarpus heterophyllus
  • Senna siamea
  • Swietenia macrophylla
  • Vitex parviflora
  • Artocarpus blancoi
  • Calophyllum lancifolium
  • Pterocarpus indicus
  • Myrica javanica
  • Toona ciliate
  • Podocarpus rumphii
  • Shorea palosapis
  • Shorea polysperma
  • Dipterocarpus kunstleri
  • Artocarpus odoratissimus
  • Parashorea plicata
  • Nephelium lappaceum
  • Theobroma cacao
  • Shorea contorta
  • Agathis philippinensis
  • Durio zibethinus
  • Hopea plagata
  • Hopea malibato

Description

  • This paper reports on the assessment of stands planted as part of the Rainforestation Farming program. 
  • The authors also discuss the management of the plantations by the landowners in context with the original intent of the planting.  
  • Data was collected beginning 6-11 years post-planting of the plots, in 2006, and stands were evaluated for stand structure and floristic composition.  Subsequent measurements were taken in 2008 and 2012.
  • Over time the researchers noted a decrease in number of species, and stem density.  Some of the reduction in stem density was the result of tree harvesting by the landowners.
  • The discussion notes that this is a dynamic system which is to be expected considering the basis of the planting and the species were selected based on the landowner/community preferences and needs. 

Geographical Region

  • Insular Southeast Asia
  • Ecosystems

  • Tropical Wet Forest
  • Country

  • Philippines
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