Resource Details

Intensive silvopastoral systems: Improving sustainability and efficiency in cattle ranching landscapes Colombia, Mexico and Brazil

Literature: Manuals, Guides, Reports

Murgueitio, E. Barahona, R., Martins, R. Xóchitl, M., Chará Flores, J., Solorio, F. J. 2014, “Intensive silvopastoral systems: Improving sustainability and efficiency in cattle ranching landscapes Colombia, Mexico and Brazil.” FAO Report.

Contact Info

Contributing author: enriquem@fun.cipav.org.co

Affiliations

  • Centre for Research in Sustainable Agricultural Production Systems, CIPAV, Cali, Colombia. www.cipav.org.co
  • Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellín, www.unal.edu.co
  • Universidade Federal de São João del-Rei, Brazil. www.ufsj.edu.br/ppbe/
  • Fundación Produce Michoacán. Morelia, México
  • Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán, México

Link(s)

Description

  • The article summarizes many productivity benefits from implementation of intensive silvo-pastoral systems (ISPS) in Colombia, Mexico and Brazil, including benefits for the well-being of cattle, heightened biodiversity, and decreased area needed for production (allowing for greater quantities of forest area).

  • The authors also summarize challenges inhibting greater adoption of intensive silvo-pastoral systems, and potential policy solutions for overcoming these challenges.

  • ISPS organizations and networks in Colombia, Mexico, and Brazil are described, as are the stakeholders in these groups.

  • Highlighted is the need for effective implementation based on using multiple policies working together to enhance the success of ISPS implementation, and on funding agents such as Project Mainstreaming Biodiversity into Sustainable Cattle Ranching in Colombia which offers a combination of technical assistance and payment for environmental services.

This database is a work in progress, and we need your input to keep it up to date. Feel free to contact ELTI at elti@yale.edu to provide information on your own work as well as other projects and literature currently missing from the database.

 

ELTI is a joint initiative of:
Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute