Resource Details

Connecting sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation: Does shade coffee provide habitat for mammals?

Literature: Journal Articles

Caudill, S. A., Declerck, F. J., & Husband, T. P. (2015). Connecting sustainable agriculture and wildlife conservation: Does shade coffee provide habitat for mammals? Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 199: 85-93.

Contact Info

Corresponding author: caudills@si.edu

Affiliations

  • Department of Natural Resources Science, University of Rhode Island

Link(s)

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Description

  • In Costa Rica, coffee farmers over the last 40 years have begun growing a higher density of coffee plants to increase production and income. By replacing habitat with plantations, many species are driven out of the area due to the absence of resources that were once plentiful.
  • The study finds that type of habitat, amount of shade, and heights of vegetation have a significant effect on small mammal composition.
  • The most important result found is the virtual similarity between small mammal species found in shade coffee and forest habitats. This finding indicates that more shade and numerous levels of vegetation supported a greater number of small mammal species.
  • Planting a lower density of coffee can not only provide farmers income, but can also support almost the same amount of small mammal species as forests.

Geographical Region

  • Central Africa
  • Country

  • Costa Rica
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