Resource Details

Lattice-work corridors for climate change: a conceptual framework for biodiversity conservation and social-ecological resilience in a tropical elevational gradient

Literature: Journal Articles

Townsend, P. A. ., and K. L. . Masters. 2015. Lattice-work corridors for climate change: a conceptual framework for biodiversity conservation and social-ecological resilience in a tropical elevational gradient. Ecology & Society 20: 70–80.

Contact Info

ptownsen@u.washington.edu

Affiliations

University of Washington

Council on International Educational Exchange

Link(s)

http://eds.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?sid=6f70ab83-1aa3-43e3-93e4-77fe5879192e@sessionmgr111&vid=0&hid=104&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZSZzY29wZT1zaXRl#AN=108282069&db=eih 

Description

In the region of Monteverde, people primarily rely on ecotourism, coffee farming, dairy cattle farming and sugarcane production to making their livings. The Pacific-slope forests are highly fragmented, and while a large biological corridor has already been proposed, it neglects certain key riparian corridors that would facilitate species migrations and range shifts, as well as protect the downstream water sources. The authors of this article also highlight the importance of diverse agroforestry systems, wind breaks, and forest restoration in farm patches as being beneficial for both enhancing landscape connectivity and biodiversity, and increasing the diversity of crops for agricultural resilience to climate change. Tree species should be selected based on their contribution to biodiversity, nutrient cycling, and ability to provide NTFPs. Incentives for landowners for incorporating reforestation or agroforestry include expanding payments for environmental services programs. In order for this type of lattice-work conservation to be achieved, community involvement is key, as is effective communication between scientists, local experts, NGOs, government institutions, and other stakeholders.   

Geographical Region

  • Southern Central America
  • Ecosystems

  • Montane Forest
  • Country

  • Costa Rica
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