Resource Details

Biomass production of trees and grasses in a silvopasture system on marginal lands of Doon Valley of north-west India

Literature: Journal Articles

Vishwanatham, M. K., Samra, J. S., & Sharma, A. R. (1999). Biomass production of trees and grasses in a silvopasture system on marginal lands of Doon Valley of north-west India. 1. Performance of tree species.Agroforestry Systems, 46(2), 181-196.

Contact Info

E-mail: cswcrti@icar.delhi.nic.in

Affiliations

Central Soil and Water Conservation Research and Training Institute, Dehradun 248 195, India

Species Info

Albizia lebbek, Grewia optiva, Bauhinia purpurea, Leucaena leucocephala, Chrysopogon fulvus, Eulaliopsis binata

Description

  • Many parts of India are degraded landscapes that should be reforested in order to better meet biomass and fodder needs of local villages.
  • Degredation originated from soil erosion off of steep slopes that occurred after deforestation
  • Parts of the Doon Valley in Northwest India near Dehradun exemplify this behavior.  A 14-year research study was conducted at the farm of the Central Soil and Water Conservation Research and Training Institute.
  • The site was a riverbed wasteland with gravelly and boulderly soils.  Soil pH was 7.3 and the nutrient profile of the soil was as follows: 0.58% organic C, 0.082% total N, 2.86 ppm Olson’s P and 44.0 ppm NH4OAc-K in 0–15 cm depth.
  • Of the four tree species, only Bauhinia purpurea showed a significant decrease in survival with only 49.3% of original planting density.  Leucaena leucocephala displayed the highest survival rate at 86.9%
  • Biomass production was surprisingly opposite of survival.  B. purpurea and A. lebbek was superior to G. optiva and L. leucocephala
  • Tree lopping was also tested.  At 50%, no significant differences were found, however at 75% DBH decreased.  
 

Geographical Region

  • South Asia
  • Country

  • India
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