Resource Details

Can Pinus plantations facilitate reintroduction of endangered cloud forest species?

Literature: Journal Articles

Avendaño-Yáñez, M. D., Sánchez-Velásquez, L. R., Meave, J. A., & Pineda-López, M. D. (2015). Can Pinus plantations facilitate reintroduction of endangered cloud forest species? Landscape and Ecological Engineering, 12(1), 99-104.

Contact Info

La´zaro Rafael Sa´nchez-Vela´squez lasanchez@uv.mx

Affiliations

Instituto de Biotecnologı´a y Ecologı´a Aplicada (INBIOTECA), Departamento de Ecologı´a y Recursos Naturales

Link(s)

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11355-015-0277-z

Species Info

Pinus patula, Juglans pyriformis, Oreomunnea mexicana

Description

  • The establishment of pine plantations has been used for timber production, mitigation of negative effects from deforestation, and facilitation of native species growth in a degraded forest. This study tests whether planting "artificial" environments, or those with pine plantations, can help restore degraded habitats and protect native and endangered tree species.
  • In this study, the tree species decreasing are the Juglans pyriformis and the Oreomunnea mexicana. By assessing the growth rate and survival of native species saplings under both open canopy and pine plantation, this study determined that pine plantations, and in this case, P. petula, can offer more suitable habitats for the reintroduction of intermediate or late-successional cloud forest species which are threatened by deforestation activities, as opposed to an open canopy. However, the variables such as growth in basal area and in height were higher in saplings under open canopy, highlighting the need for active pruning and management to maintain sunlight and solar radiation for the growing saplings. 

Country

  • Mexico
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