Resource Details

Indigenous fruit trees of Madagascar: potential components of agroforestry systems to improve human nutrition restore biological diversity

Literature: Journal Articles

Styger, E., J. E. M. Rakotoarimanana, R. Rabevohitra, and E. C. M. Fernandes. "Indigenous fruit trees of Madagascar: potential components of agroforestry systems to improve human nutrition and restore biological diversity." Agroforestry Systems 46, no. 3 (1999): 289-310.

Contact Info

E. Styger

Cornell University,

624 Bradfield Hall, Ithaca

14853, New York, USA.

eds8@cornell.edu

Affiliations

1. PASN/SNGF (Projet d’Appui au SNGF/Silo National des Graines Forestières); B.P. 5091, Ambatobe, 101 Antananarivo, Madagascar;

 

2.  SNGF (Silo National des Graines Forestières); B.P. 5091, Ambatobe, 101 Antananarivo, Madagascar;

 

3. DRFP (Département des Recherches Forestières et Piscicoles), FOFIFA, B.P. 904, 101 Antananarivo, Madagascar;

 

4. Department of Soil, Crop and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University; 620 Bradfield Hall, Ithaca 14853, New York, USA

Link(s)

http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1006295530509

Species Info

1. Psidium guajava

2. Psidium cattleianum

3. Passiflora incarnata

4. Passiflora quadrangularis

5. Citrus aurantium

6. Citrus aurantifolia

7. Citrus medica

8. Eugenia jambolana

9. Eugenia jambos

1. Labramia costata

2. Landolphia myrtifolia

3. Sorindea madagascariensis

4. Carissa sessiliflora

5. Salacia madagascariensis

6. Symphonia urophylla

7. Rheedia aphanophlebia

8. Raphia ruffia

9.Eugenia sp.

10. Syzygium sp.

11. Uapaca sp.

12. Faucherea sp.

13. Treculia madagascarica

14. Vangueria edulis

15. Calopyxis sp.

16. Dilobeia thouarsii

 

17. Ficus tiliifolia

Description

  • This study focuses on three sites in the humid forest of Eastern Madagascar, namely Masoala, Andasibe and Ranomafana. A total of 150 wild fruit tree species from 82 genera and 42 families were identified through interviews with the local populations, from which a further 26 indigenous and exotic fruit species were shortlisted based on taste, nutritional value, income generation potential, diversification from currently planted species and biodiversity protection. The key points are as follows:
  •       Trees with edible fruit are highly site specific, with 102 species out of 150 found only at a single site.
  •        Children consume a larger quantity and variety of wild fruits than adults and are able to identify over 75 percent of fruiting species. Adults recognize the importance of wild fruits to child nutrition and do not cut regenerating fruiting tree species in fallow areas (post field abandonment after slash and burn agriculture).
  •        Collection of wild fruits occurs mainly in areas with secondary regrowth in fallow areas and much less frequently in primary forest due to difficulty in accessing the trees .
  •        Far distance to markets, low prices and difficulty of accessing fruit trees in primary forests makes selling indigenous wild fruits, and planting indigenous fruit trees in farms unattractive.
  • Lemurs are the main seed dispersal agents in the humid forest, due to lack of frugivorous birds and bats as a result of evolutionary pathways. Thus, planting fruiting trees will support lemur populations and forest regeneration, potentally generate ecotourism opportunities as a result. 

Geographical Region

  • East Africa
  • Ecosystems

  • Tropical Wet Forest
  • Country

  • Madagascar
  • Subject

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