Resource Details

Why does land-use history facilitate non-native plant invasion? A field experiment with Celastrus orbiculatus in the southern Appalachians.

Literature: Journal Articles

Kuhman TR, Pearson SM, Turner MG. 2013. Why does land-use history facilitate non-native plant invasion? A field experiment with Celastrus orbiculatus in the southern Appalachians. Biol Invasions, vol. 15, pp.613–626.

Contact Info

Corresponding author: tkuhman@edgewood.edu

Affiliations

  • Department of Biological Sciences, Edgewood College, 1000 Edgewood College Dr., Madison, WI 53711, USA 
  • Department of Natural Sciences, Mars Hill College, Mars Hill, NC 28754, USA
  • Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 430 Lincoln Dr., Madison, WI 53706, USA 

Link(s)

Biological Invasions

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Species Info

  • Celastrus orbiculatus
  • Liriodendron tulipifera

Description

  • This article discusses invasion dynamics of Celastrus orbiculatus (common names: oriental bittersweet, bittersweet vine).
  • The authors found that C. orbiculatus may be especially effective at invading historically cultivated forests.

Geographical Region

  • General
  • Ecosystems

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  • Country

  • General
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