Resource Details

Ecosystem Decay of Amazonian Forest Fragments: a 22-year investigation

Literature: Journal Articles Recursos en Español - Spanish Available at NO COST

Laurance et al. 2002. Ecosystem Decay of Amazonian Forest Fragments: a 22-year investigation. Conservation Biology, vol. 16 no. 3, pp.605-618.

Contact Info

Corresponding author: laurancew@tivoli.si.edu

Affiliations

  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute , Apartado 2072, Balboa, Republic of Panamá
  • Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project , National Institute for Amazonian Research ( INPA), C.P. 478, Manaus, AM 69011–970, Brazil
  • H. John Heinz III Center for Science , Economics and Environment, 1001 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, D.C. 20004, U.S.A.
  • Department of Zoology , University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Department of Biological Sciences , Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA 70402–0736, U.S.A.
  • Conservation International , 1919 M Street, Suite 1600, Washington, D.C. 20036, U.S.A.
  • Department of Biology , University of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC 28223, U.S.A.
  • Department of Ecosystem Management , University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales 2351, Australia
  • Department of Zoophysiology , University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen, Germany

Link(s)

Available at no cost:

http://www.wec.ufl.edu/academics/courses/wis4554/WebUpdate/ReadingsWIS5555/Habitat_fragmentation/Laurance et al_2002_ConBio.pdf

Description

  • The authors discuss results from a long-term study on fragmentation in Amazonia.
  • They found that forest fragmentation can impact species diversity, abundance, and alter ecosystem dynamics.
  • The authors also found that the effects of fragmentation is compounded by other human activity to negatively impact rainforest species.

Geographical Region

  • Amazon Basin
  • Ecosystems

  • Tropical Wet Forest
  • Country

  • Peru
  • Colombia
  • Brazil
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