Resource Details

Enriching the Tropical Rain Forest with Native Fruit Trees: A Biological and Economic Analysis in Los Tuxtlas (Veracruz, Mexico)

Literature: Dissertations and Theses

Ricker, M. 1998, Enriching the Tropical Rain Forest with Native Fruit Trees: A Biological and Economic Analysis in Los Tuxtlas (Veracruz, Mexico), Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies.

Affiliations

  • Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies

Link(s)

In Library

Species Info

  • Diospyros digyna
  • Cedrela odorata

Description

  • This doctoral thesis compares the net present value of planting three native tree species in comparison with cattle pasture in Los Tuxtlas, Mexico.
  • The native species evaluated are the two fruit species Pouteria sapota (mamey) and Diospyros digyna (black sapote) and the timber species Cedrela odorata (Spanish cedar).
  • The thesis begins with the presentation of results of growth, survival, soil nutrients, and leaf nutrient studies within enrichment plantings of the three species.
  • Next, the author evaluates the correlations between fruit yield and diameter growth for the two fruit species.
  • Based on the results, the author recommends that planting Pouteria sapota in 100-300 seedlings per hectare in shelterwood systems.
  • The author explains that fruit production can provide a more stable income, as supported by the market, than timber production.
  • Cedrela odorata would be a good species for reforestation, however the author recommends planting along with the fruit species which can provide an income earlier during plantation establishment.
  • Overall, the author argues that fruit trees, although under appreciated in the field of forestry, have great potential to provide income while also successfully restoring tree cover to degraded forestlands.

Related Publications and Projects

Country

  • Mexico
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