Resource Details

Is tree diversity an important driver for phosphorus and nitrogen acquisition of a young tropical plantation?

Literature: Journal Articles

Zeugin, F., Potvin, C., Jansa, J. & Scherer-Lorenzen, M. 2010, "Is tree diversity an important driver for phosphorus and nitrogen acquisition of a young tropical plantation?", Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 260, no. 9, pp. 1424-1433.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: F. Zeugin,  fabienne.zeugin@ipw.agrl.ethz.ch

Affiliations

  • Institute of Plant, Animal and Agroecosystem Sciences, ETH Zurich, Universitaetsstrasse 2, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland
  • Department of Biology, McGill University, 1205 Dr Penfield, Montréal, QC H3A1B1, Canada
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama City, Panama
  • Institute of Plant, Animal and Agroecosystem Sciences, ETH Zurich, Eschikon 33, 8315 Lindau, Switzerland
  • University of Freiburg, Faculty of Biology, Schaenzlestrasse 1, 79104 Freiburg, Germany

Link(s)

Forest Ecology & Management

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Species Info

  • Leuhea seemanii
  • Cordia alliodora
  • Anacardium excelsum
  • Hura crepitans
  • Cedrela odorata
  • Tabebuia rosea

Description

  • This article presents the effect of native species diversity on the nitrogen and phosphorous pools above-ground in a plantation in the Canal Zone of Panama.
  • Six species (Leuhea seemanii, Cordia alliodora, Anacardium excelsum, Hura crepitans, Cedrela odorata, Tabebuia rosea) were planted in 2001 in monocultures, three species mixtures, and in six species mixtures.
  • At the end of the growing season in both 2006 and 2007, above-ground biomass was measured using tree basal diameter, tree height and DBH.
  • During the rainy seasons of 2006 and 2007, branches and leaves (sun and shade) were collected from three individuals in each plot and tested for N and P concentration.
  • For all trees together, the authors did not find a linear relationship between biodiversity and N and P pools; however the phosophorous in A. excelsum trees increased with diversity of trees in a plot.
  • Hura crepitans trees had lower P and N than the other trees in all diversity categories.
  • Although differences were not as strong as predicted, the authors assert that as the plantation increases in age, the effect of diversity on P and N concentrations may increase.

Geographical Region

  • Southern Central America
  • Country

  • Panama
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