Resource Details

Factors Limiting Tropical Rain Forest Regeneration in Abandoned Pasture: Seed Rain, Seed Germination, Microclimate, and Soil

Literature: Journal Articles

Holl, K.D. 1999, "Factors Limiting Tropical Rain Forest Regeneration in Abandoned Pasture: Seed Rain, Seed Germination, Microclimate, and Soil", Biotropica, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 229-242.

Contact Info

kholl@ucsc.edu

Affiliations

Center for Conservation Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 U.S.A

Link(s)

Biotropica

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Description

  • This research evaluates the ability of seeds to be dispersed into and germinate in areas of abandoned pasture.
  • Seed rain, germination of tree seedlings, percent herbaceous and woody cover, soil moisture, phosphorous, air temperature, and other microclimate conditions were tested in plots located 250m and 25m from the forest edge as well as within the primary forest.
  • The results found that microclimate and soil conditions were similar between the pasture and forest except in the dry season when the pasture had lower moisture.
  • In areas where grasses were not cleared, germination was similar between the forest and pasture. The biggest difference between pasture and forest was the amount of seed dispersal.
  • Seed rain in the pasture was dominated by four exotic grass species. The drop in seed rain of animal dispersed seeds with increasing distance from forest was more pronounced than in seed rain of wind dispersed.
  • The author asserts that the questions of site conditions of the pasture are secondary to improving the ability of seeds to reach the plantation.
  • The author suggests efforts to facilitate dispersal by planting native tree seedlings and installing bird perching structures.

Geographical Region

  • Southern Central America
  • Country

  • Costa Rica
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