Resource Details

Forests for the Future: Growing and Planting Native Trees for Restoring Forest Ecosystems

Literature: Books or Book Chapters

Elliott, S., Blakesley, D. & Anusarnsunthorn, V. (eds) 1998, Forests for the Future: Growing and Planting Native Trees for Restoring Forest Ecosystems.

Affiliations

  • The Forest Restoration Research Unit

Link(s)

http://www.forru.org/FORRUEng_Website/Pages/engscientificpapers.htm

Species Info

  • Ficus spp.
  • Erythrina subumbrans
  • Quercus semiserrata
  • Bischofia javanica
  • Gmelina arborea
  • Helicia nilagrica
  • Hovenia dulcis
  • Melia toosendan
  • Prunus cerasoides
  • Sapindus rarak

Description

  • This guidebook was developed by The Forest Restoration Research Unit to provide an accessible and practical guide to forest restoration.
  • The focus of the book is on reforestation in Thailand, however, most of the sections are applicable to reforestation in other parts of the tropics.
  • The guide begins with a section on species selection for reforestation, highlighting the authors' "framework species" method to accelerate the natural regeneration of degraded lands.
  • The three major groups of framework species for Thailand are native Ficus spp., leguminous species, and oaks and chestnuts.
  • The next section provides answers to important questions on seed collection and nursery establishment.
  • Detailed drawings are useful to demonstrate correct and incorrect ways of setting up potted seedlings.
  • Finally, the book provides detailed information on planning and preparing sites for plantation establishment as well as caring for and monitoring seedlings after planting.
  • They provide useful techniques for organizing planting events with local peoples.

Related Publications and Projects

Geographical Region

  • Mainland Southeast Asia
  • Country

  • Thailand
  • General
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