Resource Details

Restoration of former grazing lands in the highlands of Laos using direct seeding of four native tree species: Seedling establishment and growth performance

Literature: Journal Articles

Sovu, Savadogo, P., Tigabu, M. & Odn, P.C. 2010, "Restoration of former grazing lands in the highlands of Laos using direct seeding of four native tree species: Seedling establishment and growth performance", Mountain Research and Development, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 232-243.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: Sovu.Xengvue@ess.slu.se

Affiliations

 

  • Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Faculty of Forest Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, PO Box 101, SE-230 53 Alnarp, Sweden
  • Faculty of Forestry, National University of Laos, PO Box 7322 Vientiane, Lao PDR
  • Département Productions Forestières, Institut de l'Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles, 03 BP 7047 Ouagadougou 03, Burkina Faso

Link(s)

Mountain Research and Development

Selecting the link above redirects this page to the article on the journal website.

Species Info

  • Pinus kesiya
  • Schima wallichii
  • Keteleeria evelyniana
  • Quercus serrata

Description

  • A major limiting factor of forest recovery on abandoned pasture can be the lack of viable seed banks, especially dispersal of later-successional species.
  • Planting seeds or seedlings can ensure their presence in the area, and direct seeding can be less costly that growing seedlings in a nursery.
  • In May 2001, 29.8 ha of land was planted by two methods (even-handed broadcasting and sowing with loose soil cover) with seeds of the native species Pinus kesiya, Schima wallichii, Keteleeria evelyniana and Quercus serrata.
  • They were tested at 1, 3, and 5 years after planting to look at height, growth, and mortality.
  • The two pioneer species, P. kesiya and S. wallichii had better diameter and height growth. Mortality was significantly lowest in K. evelyniana and highest in S. wallichii.
  • There was better establishment success of buried seeds of the late-successional species Q. serratta and K. evelyniana than the broadcasted seeds.
  • The authors assert that direct seeding can improve the rehabilitation of abandoned pasture and that species-site matching is important to maximize the success of the seeding.

Geographical Region

  • Mainland Southeast Asia
  • Country

  • Lao PDR
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