Resource Details

What does it take? The role of incentives in forest plantation development in Asia and the Pacific

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Enters, T. & Durst, P. 2004, "What does it take? The role of incentives in forest plantation development in Asia and the Pacific", RAP Publication 2004/27, Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Bangkok.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: Patrick Durst, Patrick.Durst@fao.org

Affiliations

  • FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, 39 Phra Atit Road, Bangkok 10200, Thailand

Link(s)

FAO

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Description

  • This document is a compilation of case studies from different countries on the incentives and their impact on plantation development in South and Southeast Asia. 
  • Incentives can be indirect or direct. They can be small such as the provision of free seedlings or large such as tax relief for investors in reforestation. 
  • While these case studies do not specifically address native species for reforestation, they provide useful historical explanations of forest plantation investments until the document was written in 2004. 
  • The countries addressed are Australia, China, India, Indonesia, New Zealand, The Philippines, Sabah (Malaysia), Thailand, and the United States.

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