Resource Details

Analysis of the carbon sequestration costs of afforestation and reforestation agroforestry practices and the use of cost curves to evaluate their potential for implementation of climate change mitigation

Literature: Journal Articles

Torres, A.B., Marchant, R., Lovett, J.C., Smart, J.C.R. & Tipper, R. 2010, "Analysis of the carbon sequestration costs of afforestation and reforestation agroforestry practices and the use of cost curves to evaluate their potential for implementation of climate change mitigation", Ecological Economics, vol. 69, no. 3, pp. 469-477.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: a.balderastorres@utwente.nl

Affiliations

  • Environment Department, University of York, YO10 5DD, UK
  • Ecometrica, Edinburgh, EH9 1PJ, UK
  • Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente (ITESO), Tlaquepaque CP 45090 Mexico
  • Technology and Sustainable Development Section, Center for Clean Technology and Environmental Policy, University of Twente/CSTM, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands

Link(s)

Ecological Economics

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Description

  • This article analyzes the carbon sequestration costs of agroforestry afforestation/reforestation projects (ARPs) by evaluating both economies of scale and opportunity costs that affect total sequestration costs.
  • The authors use an agroforestry project called Scolel Te in Chiapas, Mexico to calculate the average net present value (ANPV) of the project in terms of carbon price and project area.
  • The authors develop seven cost curves for different sequestration options. The sequestration costs follow a U shaped distribution with cost being higher at lower and higher sizes of land considered.
  • They assert that agroforestry options that leave living fences and coffee under shade (where the whole area of land is not converted) may be the most cost effective strategy.
  • Also, payments in the early years of the project encourage people in rural areas to voluntarily engage in ARPs.

Related Publications and Projects

Country

  • Mexico
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