Resource Details

The ecology and ecosystem services of native trees: Implications for reforestation and land restoration in Mesoamerica

Literature: Journal Articles

Hall, J.S., Ashton, M., & Garen, E. 2011, "The ecology and ecosystem services of native trees: Implications for reforestation and land restoration in Mesoamerica", Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 261, no. 10, pp. 1553-1557.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: hallje@si.edu

Affiliations

  • Agua Salud Project, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 0843-03092, Balboa, Ancón, Panamá, Panama
  • School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, 370 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511, United States
  • Environmental Leadership Training Initiative, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, 370 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT 06511, United States
  • The Center for Agroforestry and School of Natural Resources, 203 Anheuser Busch Natural Resources Bldg, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, United States

Link(s)

Forest Ecology & Management

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Description

  • This article summarizes the papers presented at a conference on the state of tropical reforestation and restoration in Central America. 
  • The papers are subdivided into four categories which are each briefly discussed.
  • First, they consider a decision framework which can help practitioners to decide when and where to intervene in the restoration of an ecosystem, along with research on the factors affecting growth and mortality of different native species.
  • Second, they describe research conducted on ecosystems services related to native tree species reforestation, with specific mention given to measurements of soil carbon, water infiltration and drought tolerance.
  • Third, they address research on the use of native tree species in agroforestry, describing the benefits and how native species can be further integrated into silvopastoral systems.
  • Fourth, they briefly note the research which documents local knowledge, use and planting of native tree species.   
  • The authors conclude the article with recommendations for further research, calling for research which encompasses a broader variety of native tree species, as well as further study on the techniques for maximizing species diversity and the ecosystems services provided by forests reforested by native tree species.

Ecosystems

  • General
  • Country

    Subject

  • Miscellaneous
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