Resource Details

Species-rich but distinct arbuscular mycorrhizal communities in reforestation plots on degraded pastures and in neighboring pristine tropical mountain rain forest

Literature: Journal Articles

Haug, I., Wubet, T., Weib, M., Aguirre, N., Weber, M., Gunter, S. & Kottke, I. 2010, "Species-rich but distinct arbuscular mycorrhizal communities in reforestation plots on degraded pastures and in neighboring pristine tropical mountain rain forest", Tropical Ecology, vol. 51, no. 2, pp. 125-148.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: ingeborg.haug@uni-tuebingen.de

Affiliations

  • Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Institute of Evolution and Ecology, Organismic Botany, Auf der Morgenstelle 1, D-72076 Tübingen, Germany
  • Department of Soil Ecology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Theodor-Lieser-Straße 4, D-06120 Halle-Saale, Germany
  • Universidad Nacional de Loja, Forest Engineering, Ciudadela Universitaria La Argelia; Casilla de correo: 11-01-249, Loja, Ecuador
  • Institute of Silviculture, Department of Ecology, Technische Universität München, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising, Germany

Link(s)

Tropical Ecology

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Species Info

  • Cedrela montana
  • Heliocarpus americanus
  • Juglans neotropica
  • Tabebuia chrysantha

Description

  • This study compares the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) of 4 native species saplings growing in three types of fire-degraded pasture (recently abandoned, bracken covered, and shrub covered pasture) to the AMF richness and composition of 30 adult tree species in neighboring primary forest.
  • The authors sequenced a segment of fungal 18S rDNA from the mycorrhizas; in total, 193 glomeromycotan sequences were analyzed, with 130 of them being published for the first time.
  • In both the degraded pasture and the primary forest, members of Glomeraceae, Acaulosporaceae, Gigasporaceae and Archaeosporaleswere found.
  • The Glomus group A sequences were by far the most prevalent and diverse; however, while the AMF richness did not vary between the pasture and the primary forest plots, the composition was distinct between the two sites.
  • AMF sequences were found colonizing seedlings in the pasture that were not found in the primary forest.
  • No differences in sequence composition were detected between the three pasture types.

Geographical Region

  • Andean Region
  • Ecosystems

  • Montane Forest
  • Country

  • Ecuador
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