Resource Details

Seed development, yield and quality of two palm species growing in different tropical forest types in SE Brazil: implications for ecological restoration

Literature: Journal Articles Available at NO COST

Brancalion, P.H.S., Novembre, A.D.L.C. and Rodrigues, R.R. 2011, "Seed development, yield and quality of two palm species growing in different tropical forest types in SE Brazil: implications for ecological restoration", Seed Science & Technology, vol.39, pp.412-424.

Contact Info

  • pedrob@usp.br
  • adlcnove@esalq.usp.br
  • rrr@esalq.usp.br

Affiliations

  • Departamento de Ciências Florestais, Esalq, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 09, 13418-900, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil
  • Departamento de Produção Vegetal, Esalq, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 09, 13418-900, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil
  • Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Esalq, Universidade de São Paulo, Caixa Postal 09, 13418-900, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil

Link(s)

Seed Science and Technology

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Also available at no cost http://www.lerf.esalq.usp.br/divulgacao/produzidos/artigos/2011sstv39n2p412-424.pdf

Species Info

  • Euterpe edulis
  • Syagrus romanzoffiana

Description

  • This article examines seed production of two palms, Euterpe edulis and Syagrus romanzoffiana, in forest remnants in the state of São Paulo, Brazil.  Forest types are: Atlantic Forest, Restinga Forest, Seasonally Dry Forest, and Cerrado Forest.
  • Natural forest remnants are important as seed production fields for species used in restoration efforts and help maximize genetic diversity of material used in reforestation.  E. edulis (palmiteiro, an understory species) and S. romanzoffiana (queen-palm, an emergent) are widely used in restoration efforts due to their importance to vertebrate frugivores, but seed development, yield, size, and germination in different forest types have not been previously studied.
  • The native seed market in São Paulo state is steadily increasing, with 42 million seedlings produced in 2010.
  • In 2008, the authors harvested immature fruits from E. edulis and S. romanzoffiana at 30 day intervals after the first month of flowering of individuals that began flowering in the same month in all forest types for that species.  Germination tests were performed on seeds harvested in May of 2008 and 2009.
  • Palmiteiro seeds produced in the Atlantic Rainforest showed highest yield, quality, and dry mass, while Restinga Forest produced queen-palm seeds of highest mass and yield though of lowest quality.  Palmiteiro seeds from Restinga Forest showed lowest yield.
  • For restoration efforts, forest types from which seeds are harvested must both correspond and be physically close to the type of forest to be restored to ensure that appropriate genotypes are used; thus, seeds from sites that yield more and higher quality seeds cannot be used for restoration of any forest type.
  • The inherent heterogeneity of seeds produced in natural forest remnants, the recalcitrant behavior of some palm seeds, and the long period needed for germination present challenges for seed production in forest nurseries and for the establishment of standards of seed quality.

Related Publications and Projects

Geographical Region

  • Coastal Atlantic South America
  • Country

  • Brazil
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