Resource Details

Tropical Forest Restoration within Galapagos National Park: Application of a State-transition Model

Literature: Journal Articles Available at NO COST

Wilkinson, S.R., Naeth, M.A., & Schmiegelow, F.K.A. 2005, "Tropical Forest Restoration within Galapagos National Park: Application of a State-transition Model", Ecology and Society, vol. 10, no. 1.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: sarah.wilkinson@ualberta.ca

Affiliations

  • University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Link(s)

Ecology & Society

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Global Restoration Network

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Description

  • This article discusses the application of the state-transition model (a concept which recognizes the multiple states that exist within an ecological community) to restoration of forest on the Galapagos Islands.
  • The authors identify and describe the various forest states, with varying degrees of influence by exotic and invasive species and human disturbance, including a brief description of desired restored states.
  • Transitions between different states are identified based on whether or not they further degrade (obstacles to restoration) or improve (restoration opportunities) the forest.
  • The obstacles to restoration which are described are forest canopy gaps, limited resources, forest clearing, and unrestricted park access, while the restoration opportunities are natural regeneration, special protection status, management of invasive plant species, and propagule addition.
  • A map of the current states should be created of the forest landscape to assess the overall forest condition and as the basis for restoration and management decisions.
  • The authors emphasize that this framework combines knowledge of the different forest states with the maximization of restoration opportunities and minimization of restoration obstacles in order to increase opportunities for successful restoration.

Geographical Region

  • Other
  • Country

  • Ecuador
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