Resource Details

Use of the Amazonian Tree Species Inga edulis for Soil Regeneration and Weed Control

Literature: Journal Articles Available at NO COST

Lojka, B., Preininger, D., Van Damme, P., Rollo, A. & Banout, J. 2012, "Use of the Amazonian Tree Species Inga edulis for Soil Regeneration and Weed Control," Journal of Tropical Forest Science, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 89-101.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: lojka@itsz.czu.cz

Affiliations

  • Institute of Tropics and Subtropics, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamycka 129, Prague 6–Suchdol, 165 21, Czech Republic
  • Laboratory of Tropical and Subtropical Agriculture and Ethnobotany, Ghent University, Coupure links 653, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
  • World Agroforestry Center—ICRAF, GRP1-Domestication, PO Box 30677, Nairobi, 01000 Kenya

Link(s)

Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM)

Full Access to this document is available for no cost at the link above.

Species Info

  • Inga edulis

Description

  • This article presents research on leguminous tree-based fallows using Inga edulis in Peru. 
  • Four treatments were compared over a period of nearly 3 years: 1) natural fallow, 2) fallow with I. edulis, 3) fallow with I. edulis combined with a cover crop of kudzu (Pueraria phaseoloides), and 4) continuous cropping of cassava.
  • The results showed that the improved fallow systems successfully reduced weed biomass.
  • No significant differences were found in soil fertility among treatments; however, aboveground N, P, and K did increase more rapidly under the improved fallows.
  • The authors conclude that fallows including I. edulis have the potential to reduce weed vegetation and to increase some soil nutrients but, on highly degraded soil, longer fallows and P fertilization may be required.

Geographical Region

  • Amazon Basin
  • Ecosystems

  • Tropical Wet Forest
  • Country

  • Peru
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