Resource Details

Effects of Inga densiflora on the microclimate of coffee (Coffea arabica L.) and overall biomass under optimal growing conditions in Costa Rica

Literature: Journal Articles

Siles, P., Harmand, J.M. & Vaast, P. 2010, "Effects of Inga densiflora on the microclimate of coffee (Coffea arabica L.) and overall biomass under optimal growing conditions in Costa Rica" Agroforestry Systems, vol.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author:

Affiliations

  • Centro Agronómico Tropical de Investigación y Enseñensa (CATIE), Turrialba, 7170 Costa Rica
  • Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), UPR 80 Fonctionnement et Pilotage des Ecosystèmes de Plantations S/C UMR Eco&Sols (Sup Agro), 2 Place Viala, Bât 12, 34060 Montpellier Cedex 01, France
  • Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement (CIRAD), UPR 80 Fonctionnement et Pilotage des Ecosystèmes de Plantations, TA 10/D, Campus de Baillarguet, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, France
  • Universidad Católica del Trópico Seco (UCATSE), Esteli, Nicaragua

Link(s)

Agroforestry Systems

Selecting the link above redirects this page to the article on the journal website where the online material can be purchased or accessed if with subscription. For more information on access, see sidebar.

Species Info

  • Inga densiflora

Description

  • The article compares a shaded coffee agroforestry system (shaded with Inga densiflora) to a coffee monoculture in optimal coffee growing conditions in Costa Rica.
  • The two systems were investigated to determine differences in microclimate, coffee yield and vegetative development of the coffee plants.
  • The results found that air temperatures were moderated in the shaded system, with temperatures up to 5°C lower during the day and 0.5°C higher during the night in the shaded system, improving the microclimate; coffee leaf temperature extremes were also moderated as a result. 
  • During the early years of shade tree establishment, no significant difference was found in coffee yields between the two systems; however, as shade levels passed 60% in later years, a yield decrease of 30% was observed in the shaded plot, due to inadequate shade tree pruning.
  • Aerial biomass accumulation was 3 times as great in the shaded system.
  • The authors promote the shaded coffee system as more advantageous than the monoculture coffee crop. 

Geographical Region

  • Southern Central America
  • Country

  • Costa Rica
  • This database is a work in progress, and we need your input to keep it up to date. Feel free to contact ELTI at elti@yale.edu to provide information on your own work as well as other projects and literature currently missing from the database.

     

    ELTI is a joint initiative of:
    Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute