Resource Details

Coffee agroforestry systems in Central America: I. A review of quantitative information on physiological and ecological processes

Literature: Journal Articles

van Oijen, M., Dauzat, J., Harmand, J.M., Lawson, G. & Vaast, P. 2010, "Coffee agroforestry systems in Central America: I. A review of quantitative information on physiological and ecological processes," Agroforestry Systems, vol. 80, no. 3, pp. 341-359.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author:

Affiliations

  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (CEH-Edinburgh), Bush Estate, Penicuik, EH26 0QB UK
  • CIRAD, Montpellier, France
  • NERC, Swindon, UK
  • CATIE, Turrialba, Costa Rica

Link(s)

Agroforestry Systems

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Species Info

  • Cordia alliodora
  • Erythrina poeppigiana (exotic)
  • Eucalyptus deglupta (exotic)
  • Gliricidia sepium
  • Inga densiflora
  • Terminalia ivorensis (exotic)

Description

  • This article provides both a literature review and a summary of quantitative data necessary to develop a process-based model for coffee agroforestry systems.
  • Pertinent data on parameters and environmental drivers for coffee, shade trees and soil are presented in three separate tables.
  • The authors stress that the data available on coffee agroforestry systems is limited, especially compared to temperate climate managed systems
  • They detail what information and follow-up studies are necessary to complete the gaps in this data, in order to proceed with process-based modeling, emphasizing the following: daily weather data, long-term experiments that follow seasonal and inter-annual changes, research on the impact of tree pruning on morphology, sub-surface soil measurements
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