Resource Details

TREES Philippines: Zambales Agroforestry Project

Project: Project - Nonprofit

Contact Info

Contact: Pahuna Sharma-Laden, pahuna@treesftf.org

Affiliations

TREES for the Future - Philippines

Link(s)

www.plant-trees.org

Species Info

Hundreds of enemic species used, including

  • Vitex parviflora (Molave)
  • Pterocarpus indicus (Narra)
  • Albizia procera (Akleng-Parang)
  • Parkia javanica (Cupang)
  • Acacia confusa (Ayangili)

On very degraded sites, the project uses "Multi-Purpose Fast Growing Trees"

  • Acacia spp (exotic)
  • Leucaena leucocephala (exotic)
  • Gliricidum sepium (exotic)

Description

  • TREES for the Future is a non-profit founded to help communities around the world plant trees to help protect the environment and help preserve traditional livelihoods and cultures for generations.
  • TREES Philippines began in 2008 with the mission to rehabilitate deforested lands through agroforestry.
  • Restoration work has taken place in the municipalities of Botolan, Iba and Palauig, Zambales at the foothills of the Zambales Mountain Range, Island of Luzon.
  • These areas are dominated by the ultramatic forest type due to the high mineral content in the soil.
  • So far, TREES Philippines and its partners have planted 300.5275 hectares of public forest land and 7 hectares of mangrove forest, planting about 407,261 trees as of December 2011.
  • The project is currently working to build connections and set up tree planting actions in 10 other municipalities of Zambales and in the city of Olongapo.
  • Future goals include reaching out to four other provinces in the north, east, and south of the Zambales Mountain Range.

Related Publications and Projects

Geographical Region

  • Insular Southeast Asia
  • Country

  • Philippines
  • This database is a work in progress, and we need your input to keep it up to date. Feel free to contact ELTI at elti@yale.edu to provide information on your own work as well as other projects and literature currently missing from the database.

     

    ELTI is a joint initiative of:
    Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute