Resource Details

TREES for the Future: West Africa Program

Project: Project - Nonprofit

Contact Info

Contact: Croix Thompson, croix@treesftf.org

Affiliations

TREES for the Future

Link(s)

  • http://www.plant-trees.org/
  • Photos available at http://www.flickr.com/photos/plant-trees/collections/

Species Info

Many species, some endemic to the region. Some common species include:

  • Acacia spp. (exotic)
  • Casuarina equisetifolia (exotic)
  • Eucalyptus spp. (exotic)
  • Jatropha curcas (exotic)
  • Moringa oleifera (exotic)
  • Azadirachta indica (exotic)

Description

  • TREES for the Future is a non-profit founded to help communities around the world plant trees to help protect the environment and help preserve traditional livelihoods and cultures for generations.
  • Since 2008, the West Africa Program has been training rural farming groups to implement modern agroforestry techniques and facilitating the planting millions of trees throughout the region.
  • Larger projects are in Cameroon, Ghana, Mali and Senegal, while there are also smaller projects in Guinea, Burkina Faso, Togo, and Nigeria.
  • in 2011, over one million trees were planted alone.
  • Much of the work includes training on how agroforestry techniques (including intercropping, using natural live fences, and windbreaks) can improve crop yields, reduce erosion, and replace expensive chemical fertilizer use for crop production.
  • The project is especially interested in helping farmers develop sustainable land-use practices which can help bring economic benefits and improve their environment in areas facing rapid desertification.
  • Future plans include continued training on agroforestry and tree planting in the region.

Related Publications and Projects

Geographical Region

  • Other-Subtropics
  • Country

  • Other
  • This database is a work in progress, and we need your input to keep it up to date. Feel free to contact ELTI at elti@yale.edu to provide information on your own work as well as other projects and literature currently missing from the database.

     

    ELTI is a joint initiative of:
    Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute