Resource Details

An Ethnographic Study of Tree-Planting Successes and Failures by Small Farmers in Paraguay

Literature: Available at NO COST Dissertations and Theses

Schnobrich, K.M. 2001, 'An Ethnographic Study of Tree-Planting Successes and Failures by Small Farmers in Paraguay', MS Thesis, Michigan Technical University, Houghton, Michigan.

Affiliations

  • School of Forest Resources and Environmental Science, Michigan Technical University, Houghton, Michigan

Link(s)

Peace Corps - Master's International

Full Access to this document is available for no cost at the link above.

Species Info

  • Melia azederach (exotic)
  • Peltophorum dubium
  • Cordia trichotoma

Description

  • This thesis focuses on outlining the characteristics of farmers that successfully implement forestry projects in eastern Paraguay.
  • The work begins by providing background information on the geographical, political, and social aspects of Paraguay and the focal community, as well as a summary of the literature on agroforestry.
  • A case study is provided of a reforestation project that included three species (Melia azederach, Peltophorum dubium, Cordia trichotoma).
  • Details on the species used and project implementation are provided.
  • The author identifies the following characteristics as indicators of a farmer's likelihood for success in the implementation of forestry projects: secure land tenure, agricultural practices that meet daily needs, family sustainability, establishment of innovative projects, and outside assistance.
  • The author suggests that reforestation projects be planned with respect to a general agricultural calendar to identify when participants will have sufficient time to participate, while also recommending that projects be based on farmers' needs.

Geographical Region

  • Amazon Basin
  • Ecosystems

  • General
  • Country

  • Other
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