Resource Details

Indigenous woody species diversity in Eucalyptus globulus Labill spp. globulus plantations in the Ethiopian highlands

Literature: Journal Articles

Yirdaw, E. & Luukkanen, O. 2003, "Indigenous woody species diversity in Eucalyptus globulus Labill spp. globulus plantations in the Ethiopian highlands", Biodiversity and Conservation, vol. 12, nos. 3, pp. 567-582.

Contact Info

Eshetu Yirdaw, eshetu.yirdaw@helsinki.fi 

 

Affiliations

  • University of Helsinki, Department of Forest Ecology Tropical Silviculture Unit

Link(s)

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Species Info

  • Acacia abyssinica
  • Allophylus abyssinicus 
  • Bersama abyssinica
  • Carissa edulis
  • Hagenia abyssinica
  • Juniperus procera
  • Olea europaea 
  • Prunus africana
  • Rosa abyssinica
  • Maytenus ovatus
  • Eucalyptus sp. (Exotic)

Description

  • This study evaluates the regeneration of native woody species in eucalyptus plantations in the central highlands of Ethiopia.
  • The understory trees and shrubs were identified and measured in 11 year old plantations at Chancho, where no natural forests remain, and in 37 year old plantations at Menagesha, where there still are remnant natural forests. 
  • In the plantations 20-23 native woody species were found in the understory, and trees accounted for 55% of the naturally regenerating species. 
  • The small seeded tree species Juniperus procera was the most abundant and widely distributed species. 
  • The authors assert that the natural regeneration of native species can occur in eucalyptus plantations, however the presence of small patches of natural forest, even if degraded, serve as very important seed sources for this regeneration. 
  • They recommend that plantations be situated near remnant forests to enhance the possibility for succession, and that enrichment planting be conducted for late-successional and large seeded species. 

Geographical Region

  • East Africa
  • Ecosystems

  • Montane Forest
  • Country

  • Ethiopia
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