Resource Details

Enrichment planting of Bertholletia excelsa in secondary forest in the Bolivian Amazon: effect of cutting line width on survival, growth and crown traits

Literature: Journal Articles

Peña-Clarosa, M., Boot, R.G.A., Dorado-Lora J., & Zonta, A., 2002, "Enrichment planting of Bertholletia excelsa in secondary forest in the Bolivian Amazon: effect of cutting line width on survival, growth and crown traits", Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 161, pp. 159-168.

Contact Info

  • Tel.: 31-30-253-6699
  • Fax: 31-30-251-8366
  • m.pena@bio.uu.nl

Affiliations

  • Programa de Manejo de Bosques de la Amazonía Boliviana (PROMAB), P.O. Box 107, Riberalta, Bolivia
  • Department of Plant Ecology, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80084, 3508 TB Utrecht, The Netherlands
  • Carrera de Ingeniería Forestal, Universidad Técnica del Beni, Riberalta, Bolivia
  • IPHAE, Casilla 106, Riberalta-Beni, Bolivia

Link(s)

Forest Ecology and Management

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Species Info

Bertholletia excelsa

Description

  • Bertholletia excelsa (Brazil nut tree) seedlings were planted as enrichment plantings under a variety of different treatments in the El Tigre reserve in the northern Bolivian Amazon.
  • Survival and growth were measured for five treatments: cutting lines of 2, 4, and 6 m wide, and treatments with and without the vegetation cleared.
  • Treatments with cleared vegetation produced high survival rates (97% vs. 86.5%), though the variation in line width did not affect survival rates. 
  • Plants grew best with cleared vegetation and 6 m wide cutting line. 
  • For adequately high growth rates of this species, it is recommended that a canopy openness of 35-40% be maintained, and as such, is not a good technique for untouched understories of secondary forests where seedlings are unlikely to receive sufficient light. 
  • Planting in agricultural fields still in use may also be an effective option.

Geographical Region

  • Amazon Basin
  • Country

  • Bolivia
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