Resource Details

Profiles of carbon stocks in forest, reforestation and agricultural land, Northern Thailand

Literature: Journal Articles

Pibumrung, P., Gajaseni, N. & Popan, A. 2008, "Profiles of carbon stocks in forest, reforestation and agricultural land, Northern Thailand", Journal of Forestry Research, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 11-18.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: gnantana@chula.ac.th

Affiliations

  • Biological Sciences Program, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
  • Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand
  • Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, King Mongkut’s Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520, Thailand

Link(s)

Journal of Forestry Research

Selecting the link above redirects this page to the website the online material can be purchased or accessed if with subscription. For more information on access, see sidebar.

Species Info

  • Acacia catechu
  • afzelia xylocarpa
  • Pterocarpus macrocarpus
  • Tectona grandis
  • Eucalyptus camaldulensis (exotic)
  • Gmelina arborea (exotic)

Description

  • This study evaluates the difference in above-ground and below-ground carbon stock between forest, reforestation, and agricultural land in northern Thailand.
  • The reforestation site was planted in 1979 with four native species (Acacia catechu, afzelia xylocarpa, Pterocarpus macrocarpus, Tectona grandis) and two exotic species (Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Gmelina arborea).
  • The forest land has been protected from logging for over 50 years.
  • The agricultural areas include fallow land, orchards, paddy fields, and corn fields.
  • For both above-ground biomass, soil organic carbon, and fine root carbon, the reforestation area was significantly higher than agricultural area and significantly lower than forested area.
  • The results of this study confirm that land conversion from forest to agriculture greatly reduces the carbon storage in an area.
  • Reforestation of agricultural areas can have significant benefits for carbon storage, but still do not equal the value of conserving forests in the first place.

Geographical Region

  • Mainland Southeast Asia
  • Country

  • Thailand
  • This database is a work in progress, and we need your input to keep it up to date. Feel free to contact ELTI at elti@yale.edu to provide information on your own work as well as other projects and literature currently missing from the database.

     

    ELTI is a joint initiative of:
    Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute