Resource Details

Can legality verification rescue global forest governance? Analyzing the potential of public and private policy intersection to ameliorate forest challenges in Southeast Asia

Literature: Journal Articles

Cashore, B., Stone, M. 2012, "Can legality verification rescue global forest governance? Analyzing the potential of public and private policy intersection to ameliorate forest challenges in Southeast Asia", Forest Policy and Economics, vol. 18, pp. 13-22.

Contact Info

Corresponding author: benjamin.cashore@yale.edu

Affiliations

  • Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, USA

Link(s)

www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1389934111001961

Description

  • This study assesses the emergence of legality verification as a means to address global forest degradation.
  • The authors provide a theoretical framework that may guide future research on the questions of whether a limited scope of legality verification provides a "race to the bottom" in global forest regulation, or whether legality verification triggers the beginning of a process that may provide institutional solutions to global forest governance.
  • It is argued that a lack of forward thinking theory has biased practitioners into making short-term strategic decisions, that whether "ratcheting up" or "racheting down" will occur is dependent on whether strategic decisions are consistent with legality verification's institutionalization logic, and whether legality verification has the potential to be the link to market based governance or domestic good governance when based on those strategic decisions.
  • The authors suggest that promoting widespread policy requirements may serve to undermine the long-term potential of legality verification to intersect with private certification. 

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