Resource Details

A re-emerging Atlantic forest? Urbanization, industrialization and the forest transition in Santa Catarina, southern Brazil

Literature: Journal Articles

Baptista, S.R. & Rudel, T.K. 2006, "A re-emerging Atlantic forest? Urbanization, industrialization and the forest transition in Santa Catarina, southern Brazil", Environmental Conservation, vol. 33, no. 03, pp. 195-202.

Contact Info

Corresponding author: rudel@aesop.rutgers.edu

Affiliations

  • Department of Geography, Rutgers University
  • Department of Human Ecology, Rutgers University

Link(s)

Environmental Conservation

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Description

  • This research presents an analysis of forest cover change in the Atlantic forest of Santa Catarina, Brazil between 1975 and 1995/6.
  • In areas previously cleared between 1957 and 1988, there was an increase in planted forests, however, mostly of exotic pines and eucalyptus.
  • The authors suggest that even though there are signs of a forest transition in Santa Catarina, the type of forest that emerges is extremely important.
  • The monocultures of exotic trees provides a low biodiversity value compared with natural forests.
  • Spontaneous forest regeneration has become more common after 1985 and contributes to higher biodiversity values.
  • Although the re-emerging forest is less biodiverse, because of the improvements to water quality, carbon sequestration, and erosion control, the authors exert that the transition should be encouraged by federal policies to accelerate forest restoration.

Geographical Region

  • Coastal Atlantic South America
  • Country

  • Brazil
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