Resource Details

Forest Expansion in Northwest Costa Rica: Conjuncture of the Global Market, Land-Use Intensification, and Forest Protection

Literature: Books or Book Chapters

Daniels, A.E. 2010, "Forest Expansion in Northwest Costa Rica: Conjuncture of the Global Market, Land-Use Intensification, and Forest Protection" in Reforesting Landscapes, ed. J. Southworth, Springer Netherlands, pp. 227-252.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author:

Affiliations

  • School of Natural Resources & Environment, Land Use & Environmental Change Institute, University of Florida

Link(s)

Reforesting Landscapes

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Description

  • The authors used landsat imaging to assess land cover changes in the Tempisque Basin of Northwestern Costa Rica.
  • They find that cropland and forestland increased after 1975 along with a reduction in pasturelands.
  • The increase in forestland may be attributable to early reforestation initiatives including incentives (Payment for environmental services), protected area establishment.
  • A second reason could be due to distance from infrastructure, where areas closer to infrastructure were used for cropland.
  • The authors question the longevity of forest recovery because of how dependent that recovery was on those other reasons.
  • They assert that the role of timber trade in facilitating forest recovery is largely absent from forest transition theories.

Related Publications and Projects

Geographical Region

  • Southern Central America
  • Country

  • Costa Rica
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