Resource Details

A Tri-Partite Framework of Forest Dynamics: Hierarchy, Panarchy, and Heterarchy in the Study of Secondary Growth

Literature: Books or Book Chapters

Perz, S.G. & Almeyda, A.M. 2010, "A Tri-Partite Framework of Forest Dynamics: Hierarchy, Panarchy, and Heterarchy in the Study of Secondary Growth" in Reforesting Landscapes, ed. J. Southworth, Springer Netherlands, pp. 59-84.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author:

Affiliations

  • Department of Sociology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL USA
  • Department of Anthropological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA USA

Link(s)

Reforesting Landscapes

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Description

  • The authors present a tripartite framework of forest dynamics (TFFD) to integrate multiple theoretical explanations for land use and land cover change (LULCC) and the contextual differences between them.
  • Three different frameworks are:
  • Hierarchical framework - organizes causal pathways by spatial scale and the different social actors that operate on a specific scale.
  • Adaptive cycle framework - organizes causal pathways by temporal scale - short, medium, and long term dynamics. Also, the panarchic framework which addresses slow-fast shifts.
  • Heterarchy - incorporates changes in the causal structure for hierachical and panarchic frameworks.
  • Ideally, this can reduce the problems associated with competing explanations of causation of secondary growth forests.

Geographical Region

  • General
  • Ecosystems

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  • General
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