Resource Details

Young restored forests increase seedling recruitment in abandoned pastures in the Southern Atlantic rainforest

Literature: Journal Articles Available at NO COST

Leitão, F.H.M., Marques, M.C.M., & Ceccon, E. 2010, "Young restored forests increase seedling recruitment in abandoned pastures in the Southern Atlantic rainforest", Revista de Biología Tropical (International Journal of Tropical Biology), vol. 58, no. 4, 1271-1282.

Contact Info

Corresponding author: mmarques@ufpr.br

Affiliations

  • Laboratório de Ecologia Vegetal, Departamento de Botânica, SCB, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, PR, Brazil
  • Centro Regional de Investigaciones Multidisciplinarias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico

Link(s)

Available for free from the publisher here.

Description

  • The authors were seeking to understand if the practice of planting seedlings in abandoned pastures improves restoration outcomes in the Atlantic forest of Brazil.
  • The authors compared seedling populations in old growth forest, young restored forest, and abandoned pastures.
  • In the young restored forest and pasture, more of the seedling recruitment came from the seed bank while in the old growth forest more of the seedlings came from seed rain.
  • The young restored forest had significantly higher seedling density and species diversity in its recruitment than the abandoned pasture for seedlings from both the seed bank and seed rain.
  • Herbaceous plant seedlings showed a different trend from woody plants with diversity highest in abandoned plasture, then restored forest, and lastly old growth forest.
  • The results show that planting can increase the establishment of woody plant species in abandoned pasture areas.

Geographical Region

  • Coastal Atlantic South America
  • Country

  • Brazil
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