Resource Details

Seed Dispersal and Potential Forest Succession in Abandoned Agriculture in Tropical Africa

Literature: Journal Articles Available at NO COST

Duncan, R.S. & Chapman, C.A. 1999, "Seed Dispersal and Potential Forest Succession in Abandoned Agriculture in Tropical Africa", Ecological Applications, vol. 9, no. 3, 998-1008.

Affiliations

  • Department of Zoology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Link(s)

Available from the publishers here.

Available from the authors here.

Description

  • This authors studied bat and bird dispersal in abadoned agricultural areas adjacent to a Kibale National Park in Uganda.
  • The park is a mix of moist evergreen forest, swamp forest, selectively logged forest, exotic tree plantations, and tall grasslands.
  • Seed rain was measured in grasslands of different heights and under trees of different heights.
  • Most seeds dispersed by bats were under tall (>10 m) trees, while seeds from birds were found under midsize (3.5-10 m) and tall trees. In addition, seeds of more species of trees were found under tall trees.
  • There was no relationship between distance to forest edge and seed rain up to 150 m from the forest edge.
  • The species of seeds found in the seed rain were mainly from Ficus (50%) and shrubs (30%) that could not grow there. The lack of dispersal of tree seeds is another reason that regeneration happens slowly.
  • Despite being close to the forest, less than 1% of seeds found were from forest trees and shrubs.
  • Seed traps in short and tall grasses without trees collected almost no seeds.
  • There are not the strong pioneer species in this area as there are in Latin America and Asia.

Geographical Region

  • Central Africa
  • Country

  • Uganda
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