Resource Details

Seed germination and seedling establishment of Neotropical dry forest species in response to temperature and light conditions

Literature: Journal Articles

González-Rivas, B., Tigabu, M., Castro-Marín, G. & Christer Odén, P. 2009, "Seed germination and seedling establishment of Neotropical dry forest species in response to temperature and light conditions", Journal of Forestry Research, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 99−104.

Contact Info

Corresponding author: mulualem.tigabu@ess.slu.se
 

Affiliations

  • Facultad de Recursos Naturales y del Ambiente, Universidad Nacional Agraria, Managua, Nicaragua
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Alnarp, Sweden

Link(s)

Available from the publisher here.

Species Info

  • Cedrela odorata
  • Guaiacum sanctum
  • Calycophyllum candidissimum

Description

  • The purpose of this study was to look at the germination requirements and impacts of light intensity on the growth and survival of Cedrela odorata, Guaiacum sanctum and Calycophyllum candidissimum.
  • The study was conducted in the dry forest of Nicaragua.
  • Calycophyllum candidissimum preferred light for germination and constant temperatures within 20–35ºC. Light is an absolute requirement for germination. 
  • C. odorata and G. sanctum germinated in both light and dark with the best performance around 20-25ºC.
  • G. sanctum seedlings had the best survival rates - 70% under the canopy and 80% in the open.
  • C. odorata seedlings had poor survival rates under the canopy and in the open.
  • Because of the high survival rate of G. sanctum, the authors suggested that this species would be good for planting seedlings in open areas during reforestation efforts and enrichment plantings of degraded areas.

Geographical Region

  • Southern Central America
  • Country

  • Nicaragua
  • This database is a work in progress, and we need your input to keep it up to date. Feel free to contact ELTI at elti@yale.edu to provide information on your own work as well as other projects and literature currently missing from the database.

     

    ELTI is a joint initiative of:
    Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute