Resource Details

The value of rehabilitating logged rainforest for birds

Literature: Journal Articles

Edwards, D.P., Ansell, F.A., Ahmad, A.H., Nilus, R. & Hamer, K.C. 2009, "The value of rehabilitating logged rainforest for birds", Conservation Biology, vol, no. 23, pp. 1628–1633.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: d.p.edwards@leeds.ac.uk

Affiliations

o   Institute of Integrative and Comparative Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, United Kingdom
o   Institute of Tropical Biology and Conservation, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Sabah, Malaysia
o   Forest Research Centre, Sepilok, Sabah, Malaysia

Description

o   Authors suggest that rehabilitation of selectively logged forests is a more effective carbon sink than a plantation (this rehab involves enrichment planting and cutting bamboos, lianas, etc.).
o   Researchers examined a lowland, dry dipterocarp forest in Sabah, Malaysia that had been selectively logged in 1988-89. One area was rehabilitated (enrichment planting and liberation cutting of vines, bamboos, and noncommercial species). This area was surrounded by a naturally reforesting area.
o   Found that avian species richness is higher in unlogged and rehabilitated forests than in naturally regenerating forests.
o   Species composition was also distinct between sites - insectivorous species were lower in naturally regenerating sites.
o   Although many guilds has higher richness in the rehabilitated site, rehabilitation decreased the number of frugivores (most likely because many subcanopy and understory frugivores feed mainly on vines and shrubs.
o   Authors conclude that forest rehabilitation is positive for biodiversity and for carbon capture, and that biodiversity strategies should be included in REDD+ activities

Geographical Region

  • Insular Southeast Asia
  • Ecosystems

  • Tropical Wet Forest
  • Country

  • Malaysia
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