Resource Details

The Evolution of Reforestation in Brazil

Literature: Journal Articles Available at NO COST

Caetano Bacha, C.J. 2006, "The Evolution of Reforestation in Brazil", Oxford Development Studies, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 243-263.

Affiliations

  • Luiz de Queiroz College of Agriculture, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Link(s)

Available at no cost http://www-sre.wu-wien.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa03/cdrom/abstracts/a153.html

Description

  • This article describes the history of incentives for reforestation in Brazil from the 1970s through 2001.
  • Recognizing a scarcity of roundwood due to deforestation, the Brazilian government created a program with financial incentives for reforestation in the 1960s.
  • Additional federal policies were created to stimulate reforestation efforts by granting monetary resources and agricultural inputs to groups reforesting in Brazil.
  • During this time, the annual reforested area increased from 34,760 hectares in 1967 to 409,015 hectares in 1986, with 1976 having the highest annual reforestation of 449,249 hectares.
  • From 1989 to 2001, the Brazilian government ended federal money directed toward reforestation.
  • Without those incentives, some state governments implemented programs to promote reforestation.
  • During this time, however, demand for roundwood increased while production stagnated.
  • In 2002, the Brazilian government began a program to offer low interest rate loans for reforestation, but have not been very effective at improving reforestation.
  • The author suggests that a new federal policy be instated to promote reforestation on small and medium sized farms.

Ecosystems

  • General
  • Country

  • Brazil
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