Resource Details

Timber investment returns for selected plantations and native forests in South America and the Southern United States

Literature: Journal Articles

Cubbage, F. et al. 2007, "Timber investment returns for selected plantations and native forests in South America and the Southern United States", vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 237-255.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: fred_cubbage@ncsu.edu

Affiliations

North Carolina State University Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources Raleigh NC 27695-8008 USA Raleigh NC 27695-8008 USA

(see article link for all author affiliations)

Species Info

  • Pinus spp. (exotic)
  • Eucalyptus spp. (exotic)
  • Nothofagus spp.
  • Araucaria angustifolia

Description

  • This study examined the value of timber investments in South America: exotic Eucalyptus in the southern cone (Argentina + Chile) are the most profitable, with Internal Rate of Return of 13-23%, followed by exotic loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), whereas investments in the southeast USA is less profitable.
  • Financial returns for natural stands in Latin America were much lower than in commercial plantations.
  • Typically only 0-20% of Neotropical forests species have commercial value. (Lamprecht 1990)
  • Containerized seedlings are used in most of tropical America, while bare root seedlings are more common in North America.
  • Exotic plantations have historically had less biological risk than native tree plantations (partially due to lack of pathogens and pests).
  • Data on timber stumpage values (wood value) are few for native tropical timber. In the southern cone, native timber (Nothofagus spp. and Araucaria angustifolia) are similar or less in value than exotic pine and eucalyptus.

Geographical Region

  • Other
  • Andean Region
  • Ecosystems

    Country

  • Brazil
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