Resource Details

Effect of vegetation restoration on soil and water erosion and nutrient losses of a severely eroded clayey Plinthudult in southeastern China

Literature: Journal Articles

Zhang, B., Yang, Y. S., & Zepp, H. 2004. "Effect of vegetation restoration on soil and water erosion and nutrient losses of a severely eroded clayey Plinthudult in southeastern China", Catena, vol. 57 no. 1, pp. 77-90.

Contact Info

Corresponding Author: bzhang@ns.issas.ac.cn

Affiliations

  • Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 821, Nanjing 210008, PR China
  • Geographical Institute, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany

Link(s)

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Species Info

  • Lespedeza bicolor
  • Cinnamomum camphora
  • Castanopsis sclerophylla
  • Cinnamomum porrectum
  • Camptotheaca acuminata

Description

  • In this study, researchers compared erosion from reforested and degraded sites in ubtropical southeastern China. 
  • Steep slopes and intensive agriculture have left many areas of this region of China devoid of top soil with the C soil layer exposed. Lespedeza bicolor, Cinnamomum camphora and a few other local trees were selected and planted in degraded sites along contours, using stone dikes and gullies.
  • Erosion varied from 53 to 256 tons ha−1 sediment runoff on unplanted sites to 2–43 tons ha−1 year−1 on reforested sites. Authors conclude that reforestation is an effect strategy to reduce erosion. 

Geographical Region

  • Other-China
  • Ecosystems

  • General
  • Country

  • China
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