Resource Details

Effect of site preparation and initial fertilization on the establishment and growth of four plantation tree species used in reforestation of Zmperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv. dominated grasslands

Literature: Journal Articles

Otsamo, A., Adjers, G., Hadi, T.S., Kuusipalo, J., Tuomela, K., Vuokko, R. (1995) Effect of site preparation and initial fertilization on the establishment and growth of four plantation tree species used in reforestation of Zmperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv. dominated grasslands. Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 73, pp. 271-277.

Contact Info

Fax. -62-5l1-9 3222

Affiliations

  • Enso Forest Development, Reforestarion and Tropical Forest Management Project, Indonesia
  • Balai Teknologi Reboisasi Banjarbarurbaru, Indonesia
  • Enso Forest Development, Finland

 

Link(s)

Forest Ecology and Management

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Species Info

  • Imperata cylindrica
  • Gmelina arborea
  • Paraserianthes falcataria
  • Acacia mangium
  • Swietenia macrophylla

Description

  • Reports the findings of site preparation techniques for four native tree species regeneration in Imperata cylindrica - dominated areas of South Kalimantan, Indonesia
  • Complete plowing emerged as the most effective site preparation (grass removal) method to favor tree survivorship and growth, because of I. cyclindrica's horizontal spreading and quick invasion of plowed strips.
  • NPK fertilization favored seedling growth, but the authors stress the need for further research on the long-lasting effects of fertilization.

Geographical Region

  • Insular Southeast Asia
  • Country

  • Indonesia
  • Subject

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