Resource Details

Avian communities in forest fragments and reforestation areas associated with banana plantations in Costa Rica

Literature: Journal Articles

Matlock, Robert B., Dennis Rogers, Peter J. Edwards, and Stephen G. Martin. 2002, "Avian communities in forest fragments and reforestation areas associated with banana plantations in Costa Rica." Agriculture, ecosystems & environment, vol. 91, no. 1, pp. 199-215.

Contact Info

rmatlock@sloth.ots.ac.cr

Affiliations

  • Escuela de Agricultura de la Región Tropical Húmeda (EARTH), Apartado 4442-1000, San José, Costa Rica
  • Syngenta, Jeallotts Hill Research Station, Bracknell, Berkshire RG42 6ET, UK

Link(s)

Agriculture, Ecosystems, & Environment

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Species Info

  • Zygia longifolia

Description

  • This study evaluated the avian diversity value of reforested and secondary forest fragments in a matrix of banana plantations in Caribbean Costa Rica.
  • In Costa Rica, banana producers (Dole and Delmonte) retain riparian buffer forests in addition to reforestation on lands removed from production. Reforested and secondary forest fragments were dominated by Zygia longifolia
  • Of the more than 400 birds observed at nearby primary forest of La Selva, this study observed approximately half in the reforested/secondary fragments in the plantation zone (206 species in point counts and mist net capture).
  • This study observed few birds classified as medium and high susceptibility to disturbance. However, the authors note that several species of large frugivores and understory insectivores, taxa that are frequently cited as rare in disturbed forests, were recorded in the plantation/reforestation fragments.
  • Limitations – it should be noted that this study merely notes the presence of birds in the fragmented/reforested areas, and not permanence, food resources, or nesting. Additionally, the study was funded by an agro-chemical company.

Geographical Region

  • Southern Central America
  • Ecosystems

  • Tropical Wet Forest
  • Country

  • Costa Rica
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