Resource Details

Migratory bird species in young tropical forest restoration sites: effects of vegetation height, planting design, and season

Literature: Journal Articles

Lindell, C. A., Cole, R. J., Holl, K. D., & Zahawi, R. A. 2012. Migratory bird species in young tropical forest restoration sites: effects of vegetation height, planting design, and season. Bird Conservation International, vol. 22 no. 1, pp. 94.

Contact Info

Corresponding author: lindellc@msu.edu

Affiliations

  • Zoology Department/Center for Global Change and Earth Observations, Michigan State University, 1405 S. Harrison Rd., East Lansing, Michigan 48823, USA
  • Environmental Studies Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
  • Environmental Studies Department, University of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA
  • Las Cruces Biological Station, Organization for Tropical Studies, San Vito, Costa Rica

Link(s)

Bird Conservation International

Species Info

  • Terminalia amazonica
  • Vochysia guatemalensis
  • Erythrina poeppigiana
  • Inga edulis

Description

  • This study examines the difference in habitat preference of four migratory birds in restored forests in southern Costa Rica.
  • The restoration sites were 4-5 years old, planted with Terminalia amazonica, Vochysia guatemalensis, Erythrina poeppigiana, andInga edulis. Initial planting were conducted in restoration patches of 50m x 50m, planted either entirely (plantation style) or in small mini-patches (island technique). Birds in these areas were compared with control sites where there was no planting.
  • Researchers used mist nets to monitor four Neotropical migrants: Chestnut-sided Warbler Dendroica pensylvanica, Mourning Warbler Oporornis philadelphia, Swainson’s Thrush Catharus ustulatus, and Tennessee Warbler Vermivora peregrina.
  • Chestnut-sided Warblers, Swainson’s Thrushes, and Tennessee Warblers were captured significantly more often in plantations than islands or controls. The Mourning Warbler was the only species for which vegetation height was a significant positive influence. This is likely because these four species are identified as species that use woody vegetation.
  • Beyond the four target species, more birds were caught in the plantation (24) than in the islands (19) and in the control area (15).
  • Authors conclude that although plantation-style restoration treatments are more expensive than islands, they may be more ecologically effective for Neotropical migratory birds.

Geographical Region

  • Southern Central America
  • Country

  • Costa Rica
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