Resource Details

Drivers of regrowth in South Asia's human-impacted forests

Literature: Journal Articles Available at NO COST

Nagendra, H. 2009, “Drivers of regrowth in South Asia's human-impacted forests” Current Science, vol. 97, no. 11, pp. 1586 – 1592.

Contact Info

Corresponding author: nagendra@indiana.edu

Affiliations

  •  Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment (ATREE), Royal Enclave, Sri Ramapura, Jakkur P.O., Bangalore 560 064, India
  • Center for the Study of Institutions, Population, and Environmental Change ( CIPEC), Indiana University, 408 N. Indiana Ave., Bloomington, IN 47408, USA

Link(s)

Available at no cost

http://www.currentscience.ac.in/Downloads/article_id_097_11_1586_1592_0.pdf

Description

  • Using a combination of site-specific and cross-site case studies from India and Nepal, Nagendra attempts to identify a range of factors that drive forest change in different contexts and to pinpoint “rules in use” that increase effectiveness of a given management regime on the ground.
  • The author maintains that tenure, monitoring, group size, and flexibility are the most important factors in determining effective forest management.
  • Specifically: (1) Formal ownership is less important than actual management rules and mechanisms; (2) Monitoring is most effective where local communities participate or are given a role in creating the rules; in these cases it can also be done occasionally and inexpensively; (3) Forest management is most effective with intermediately sized groups, large enough to accomplish the work necessary but small enough to allow communication and coordination; (4) Community groups are more successful when given the flexibility to modify rules according to local ecological or social contexts.
  • The author concludes that research that incorporates long-term research at different temporal and spatial scales and that link empirical data from multiple methods are necessary to study the social-ecological factors of forest regrowth in human-dominated systems

Geographical Region

  • South Asia
  • Ecosystems

  • General
  • Country

  • India
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