Resource Details

Spatial interpolation of carbon stock: a case study from the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot, India

Literature: Journal Articles

Shijo, J., Sudhakar, C. Reddy, A.P.T., Srivastava S.K. Srivastava V.K. 2010. “Spatial interpolation of carbon stock: a case study from the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot, India” International Journal of Sustainable Development & World Ecology, vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 481-486.

Contact Info

Corresponding author: shijonrsa@gmail.com

Affiliations

  • School of Environmental Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, Kerala, India
  • Department of Natural Resources, International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC), Enschede, The Netherlands
  • Forestry and Ecology Division, National Remote Sensing Centre, Indian Space Research Organization, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India
  • Tamil Nadu Forest Department, Geomatics Centre, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India
  • Land Resources Group, National Remote Sensing Centre, Indian Space Research Organization, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India
 

Link(s)

International Journal of Sustainable Development & World Ecology

Selecting the link above redirects this page to the article on the journal website where the online material can be purchased or accessed if with subscription. For more information on access, see the Access section in the sidebar.

Description

  • This study in the Anamalai Hills of the Western Ghats estimates the biomass and carbon stock of major tropical forest types in India and attempts to identify suitable interpolation techniques to map carbon stock.
  • During 2005–2006, circular plots of 10-m radius were laid every 200 m along transects stratified by vegetation type and all woody plants with ≥ 10 cm DBH were identified to species level and measured. Biomass was calculated using allometric equations developed specifically for use in evergreen and deciduous forests of the Western Ghats.
  • Nine different land-cover classes were identified using fieldwork and images from Indian Remote Sensing Satellite P6 LISS III and forest area statistics were derived from supervised classification. Vegetation and landcover type mapping using the IRS P6 LISS III data showed the area is dominated by deciduous forest (487.6 km2) and evergreen forest (230.2 km2).
  • The average values of the carbon stock in the whole of Anamalai Wildlife Sanctuary was 84 t/ha. Evergreen forest had a high amount of biomass (236.8 t/ha) whereas thorny scrub had a low biomass (32.23 t/ha). Total carbon stock across all forest types was 6.44 Mt of carbon.
  • The authors found Kriging to be the best method for spatial interpolation of carbon stock, in comparison with IDW and polynomial using parameters derived from semivariograms.

 

Geographical Region

  • South Asia
  • Country

  • India
  • This database is a work in progress, and we need your input to keep it up to date. Feel free to contact ELTI at elti@yale.edu to provide information on your own work as well as other projects and literature currently missing from the database.

     

    ELTI is a joint initiative of:
    Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute