Resource Details

Restoring working forests in human dominated landscapes of tropical South Asia: An introduction

Literature: Journal Articles

Ashton, M.S., Goodale, U.M, Bawa, K.S., Ashton, P.S. & Neidel, J.D. 2014, "Restoring working forests in human dominated landscapes of tropical South Asia: An introduction", Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 329, pp. 335-339.

Contact Info

corresponding author: mark.ashton@yale.edu

Affiliations

  • School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA
  • Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Menglun, Mengla, Yunnan 666303, PR China
  • Department of Biology, University of Massachusett, Boston, MA 02125, USA
  • Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
  • Environmental Leadership and Training Initiative, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511, USA

Link(s)

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378112714002680#

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Description

  • The authors provide an introduction and literature review of the resource issues around restoring human-dominated landscapes in tropical South Asia
  • Broadly, these issues can be divided into two major topics: forest fragmentation and forest restoration. 
  • The topic of forest fragmentation includes issues such as: the decreases in forest structure and standing carbon stocks in forest fragments as compared to in contiguous forests, the changes in bird composition and flock density in relation to land-use type, and sacred groves as forest fragments and their potential role as centers of restoration in the future.
  • The topic of restoration includes issues such as: the benefits of plantations to establish second growth forests or plant native species, including planting of indigenous plants that produce non-timber forest products in forest restoration programs, and facilitating natural forest restoration in montane grasslands by controlling fire, preparing soils, or protecting from herbivory.
  • The authors summarize the other papers that appear in this special issue
  • Finally, the authors recommend that more research should be done on the domestication of promsing non-timber forest products; on certain forest types, such as montane forests and dry and semi-evergreen tropical forests in South Asia; on the social and cultural aspects of restoration; and on the value that reforestoration and forest fragments can have in terms of ecosystem services and conservation. 

Geographical Region

  • South Asia
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