Resource Details

Gmelina Boom, Farmers' Doom: Tree growers' risks, coping strategies and options

Literature: Available at NO COST Manuals, Guides, Reports

Pasicolan, Paulo N. and Macandog, Damasa M, 2007. "Gmelina boom, farmers’ doom: Tree growers’ risks, coping strategies and options". In: Steve Harrison, Annerine Bosch and John Herbohn, Improving the Triple Bottom Line Returns from Small-scale Forestry: Proceedings from an International Conference. Improving the Triple Bottom Line Returns from Small-scale Forestry, Ormoc, the Philippines, pp. 313-319. 18 - 21 June 2007.

Contact Info

E-mail: paulopasicolan56@gmail.com

Affiliations

College of Forestry and Environmental Management (CFEM), Isabela State University (ISU)

Link(s)

This article is available at no cost here: University of Queensland

Species Info

Gmelina arborea

Description

  • Government programs to encourage tree planting of gmelina were initially successful in the 1980s but have now become unpopular because of disappointment over the low profitability of trees for smallholders; about 90% of gmelina growers have now stopped or have switched to other tree crops
  • Despite the presence of local research centers advocating and providing technical support for tree growing and conservation, economic considerations caused farmers to cease tree growing activity
  • Government support is needed to help smallholders cope with price fluctuations for timber and tree products
  • The authors interviewed ten farmers about their recommendations for the government to improve the financial and regulatory environment for tree farming
  • The authors’ analysis of the policy implications indicate that governments should provide enabling policies and incentives and encourage private sector involvement in smallholder agroforestry.

 

Geographical Region

  • Insular Southeast Asia
  • Ecosystems

    Country

  • Philippines
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