Resource Details

Fallow to forest: Applying indigenous and scientific knowledge of swidden cultivation to tropical forest restoration

Literature: Journal Articles

Wangpakapattanawong, P., Kavinchan, N., Vaidhayakarn, C., Schmidt-Vogt, D., Elliott, S., 2010. "Fallow to forest: Applying indigenous and scientific knowledge of swidden cultivation to tropical forest restoration." Forest Ecology and Management vol. 260, no. 8, pp. 1399-1406

Contact Info

  • Corresponding Author: Prasit Wangpakapattanawong
    • E-mail: prasit.w@chiangmai.ac.th
    • Tel.: +66 53 943 346x1113
    • fax: +66 53 892 259

Affiliations

  • Department of Biology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand
  • Centre for Mountain Ecosystem Studies, Kumming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Science, Heilongtan, Kunming 650204, PR China
  • Forest Restoration Research Unit, Department of Biology, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand

Link(s)

Forest Ecology and Management

Selecting the link above redirects this page to the article on the journal website where the online material can be purchased or accessed if with subscription.  For more information on access, see sidebar.

Species Info

  • Archidendron clypearia
  • Castanopsis spp.
  • Magnolia bombycina
  • Schima wallichii
  • Styrax benzoides
  • Anneslea fragrans
  • Flacourtia indica
  • Eugenia fruticosa
  • Buddleja asiatica
  • Aporosa octandra
  • Aporosa villosa
  • Melicope glomerata
  • Wendlandia tinctoria
  • Lithocarpus polystachyus
  • Macaranga kurzii
  • Eurya acuminata
  • Eugenia albiflora
  • Leea indica
  • Eupatorium adenophorum
  • Eupatorium odoratum
  • Pteridium aquilinum
  • Mitragyna hirsuta
  • Macaranga denticulata

Description

  • Studied vegetation at two sites of shifting cultivation by Lawa and Karen indigenous people in the Mae Chaem watershed in 1-year, 3-year and 6-year fallow fields, with an area of natural forest as a control comparison.
  • Found that if fallows are protected from fire and cattle browsing, they have considerable potential for natural forest recovery.
  • The similarities between the forest restoration plots of the Forest Restoration Research Unit (FORRU-CMU) and the swidden fallows imply that methods of planting pioneer tree species can lead to similar results as the semi-natural regeneration mechanism of the shifting cultivation system.
  • Additionally, the indigenous knowledge of edible species, medicinal and construction species and on natural tree regeneration mechanisms of swidden cultivators could be useful for forest restoration of degraded lands.

Geographical Region

  • Mainland Southeast Asia
  • Country

  • Thailand
  • This database is a work in progress, and we need your input to keep it up to date. Feel free to contact ELTI at elti@yale.edu to provide information on your own work as well as other projects and literature currently missing from the database.

     

    ELTI is a joint initiative of:
    Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute